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Raising the Bar in Healthcare Leadership

Schulich SEEC’s Masters Certificate promotes excellence in healthcare management practice

 

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The good news: people are living longer and huge advances in medical treatments give healthcare professionals many more ways to help us.

The bad news: this creates unprecedented demand that healthcare systems around the world are struggling to meet.

With hospitals and surgeries patently overstretched we hear continual calls for politicians to provide ever more funding, but not enough about the need for innovative new management practices and better healthcare leadership to help alleviate the pressures on the system.

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Schulich SEEC’s Masters Certificate in Healthcare Management prepares healthcare professionals for the challenge of leadership

Dates: Seven self-standing modules run over 14 days from March 8 - June 8, 2019  Format: In-class study │ Location: Toronto

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More funding may well be justified, but many of the reasons staff are stressed and hospitals under-preform are down to basic management organizational issues; where a culture of continuous improvement in work practices could eliminate waste and inefficiency, reduce stress and frustration for staff, and in turn improve patient experience.

To achieve a better organizational culture, better management skills are needed at all levels and this requires training. The Schulich SEEC Masters Certificate in Healthcare Management is almost unique in providing sophisticated leadership development for  managers operating in this complex and rapidly-changing sector.

While, managing in multi-stakeholder, complex, healthcare environments can be extremely challenging, the good news here is that new management practices have evolved, in other industry sectors, which can be applied with great success to healthcare.

The SEEC Certificate offers learning that integrates healthcare sector-specific skills and knowledge with ways these exciting new practices can be applied, taking account of worker’s changing expectations and the breakthrough medical advances and new technologies revolutionising the sector.

The Masters Certificate focuses on three overlapping areas of development:

  1. Leadership skills – Such as how to employ critical thinking in problem solving and decision making; how to manage projects; and how to lead change initiatives;
  2. Softer ‘people’ skills – Such as emotional intelligence; effective communication; resolving conflicts; and encouraging innovation;
  3. Specialized management skills – Such as how to implement ‘Lean’ methodology; managing risk; aligning IT with organizational strategies; and how to get maximum advantage from new technologies and new medical advances.

Managers, directors and physicians that master these three critical skills will be more effective when dealing with the issues they face on a daily basis and, from a career perspective, better positioned to move up into senior roles. They will also be more able to contribute to achieving organizational excellence, and ultimately able to help shape a better healthcare system overall.

Delivered by faculty, including leaders in healthcare, business and academia, the program consists of seven self-standing two-day modules:

  1. Advanced leadership;
  2. Critical thinking, project planning and problem solving;
  3. Designing lean processes;
  4. Successful communication, quality and safety strategies and conflict resolution;
  5. Information technology for healthcare leaders;
  6. Leading change and innovation;
  7. Risk management and courageous leadership in healthcare.

Video: Program Director Emma Pavlov talks about the challenges facing today's healthcare leaders (3.05minutes)


Based in Toronto, Canada, the Schulich Executive Education Centre (SEEC) is a world-leader in individual learning and corporate learning





 
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