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Managing the Modern Supply Chain

Schulich SEEC’s Masters Certificate supports current and future supply chain managers in their fast changing and critical business role

 

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Although quintessentially operational, supply chain management has enormous strategic implications. In today’s highly competitive environment, where even one element out of alignment in the chain can put customer loyalty and profitability at risk, the role of the supply chain manager has become more critical and more strategic.

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Join SEEC’s Masters Certificate in Supply Chain and Logistics Management to consolidate your management skills and strengthen your strategic thinking

Date: Feb 8 to June 22 │ Format: 14 days of in-class study │ Location: Toronto

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Three major trends have made the job of controlling all the links in the chain for creating and distributing goods increasingly complex:

First, supply chains which were once relatively simple, because commerce was local, now typically extend over multiple global locations, involve numerous logistical and financial transactions with many individuals and organizations, and can often extend over months.

Secondly, customers have become increasingly more demanding and service conscious – because Amazon offers next-day delivery this the new normal. Staying ahead of the competition is as much about the quality of service and delivery a company gives its customers as it is about the how their products differ from those of their competitors.

Thirdly, fast developing technologies are transforming supply chain operations improving the way vendors and suppliers stay on top of who needs what, when and how. Furthermore, blockchain technology is now set to accelerate this transformation, increasing the efficiency and transparency of supply chains by automating transactions between suppliers and vendors in a way that could not easily be automated before.

In addressing these three major trends, the role of the supply chain manager – harnessing a technology-enabled, integrated, supply chain operations plan – has never been so important or so complex.

In response to the challenges faced by supply chain professionals, Schulich SEEC has launched a Masters Certificate in Supply Chain and Logistics Management. The program’s central theme is that all operational functions across the supply chain should be integrated: the selling cycle integrated with the delivery cycle integrated with the planning cycle, and that all of the logistics and supply chain functions should be supported by leading edge technology and the application of up-to-date knowledge and strategic thinking.

The program is delivered as a series of seven two-day modules over five months:

Module 1: Strategic Planning Through Your Supply Chain – Setting the stage with an overview of how supply chain strategy and operations fit together in leading companies.

Module 2: Inventory Management and Sourcing to Optimize Operations – Harness inventory management as the core of supply chain.

Module 3: Distribution Centre Planning and Transportation Management – Applying modern and effective distribution centre and freight management techniques you can use now.

Module 4: Service Quality, Project Management and Change Leadership – Meeting customer expectations profitably with service quality.

Module 5: Lean Supply Chain – Learn and apply Lean principles to your supply chain to eliminate waste and grow profits.

Module 6: Effective Leadership in Your Supply Chain – Focusing your teams and motivating their actions effectively.

Module 7: Supply Chain Integration – The fibre that threads your supply chain together.

Director Mark Thomas explains how you can become a supply chain leader.


Based in Toronto, Canada, the Schulich Executive Education Centre (SEEC) is a world-leader in individual learning and corporate learning





 
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